Cleaning The Stove: Some Hot Tips

woman ovenCleaning the stove can be one of those chores that make a root canal seem more pleasant to endure. Still, it doesn’t have to be that way if you don’t want it to be. Consider your stove a mountain with many stubborn stains to climb at the top of which is sunshine and a sense of accomplishment. Ponder the following tips the next time you are faced with the formidable task of cleaning your friend and sometimes-charred companion, the stove.

Cleaning the Stovetop :
Most stovetops can be washed down with hot water and regular detergent. For those spills that have lived for a long time rent-free on your range surface or on those chrome and stainless steel parts, use a little baking soda and water. They will vacate the premises soon after you apply a smooth paste to the area and leave it on for five to ten minutes. Then wipe it off with a soft cloth and rinse with a solution of white vinegar mixed with water. Results are reminiscent of that old song, “Nowhere to run to, baby; nowhere to hide.”

For the cleanest oven top on your block, mix equal parts warm water and ammonia. Apply, wait thirty seconds and then rub as necessary. Rubbing alcohol also brings a beautiful shine to your stovetop. To clean and shine those messy chrome burner trim-rings, rub well with a paste of vinegar and cream of tartar.

Stove Burner Drip-Pans
One quick way to clean burner drip pans and rings is to simply add them to your next dishwasher cycle (after asking permission first from the washer, of course. No need to offend an innocent appliance). For stubborn stains on drip-trays, place an ammonia-soaked cloth in it and leave it overnight. Wash off well with dish soap and water.

Remember that only you can prevent a dirty stove. (I ought to know. I have one.)
Happy Stove Cleaning.

Related Reading:

“Some Unexpected Household Hints”

http://forums.families.com/kitchen-baths-amp-bedrooms,f392

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About Marjorie Dorfman

Marjorie Dorfman is a freelance writer and former teacher originally from Brooklyn, New York. A graduate of New York University School of Education, she now lives in Doylestown, PA, with quite a few cats that keep her on her toes at all times. Originally a writer of ghostly and horror fiction, she has branched out into the world of humorous non-fiction writing in the last decade. Many of her stories have been published in various small presses throughout the country during the last twenty years. Her book of stories, "Tales For A Dark And Rainy Night", reflects her love and respect for the horror and ghost genre.

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