Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1963-1967

Come read the books deemed worthy of the Caldecott Medal! I am giving a brief synopsis of each book along with a comment about the artwork here and there. I am also including lists of the Honor winners for each year. I hope you enjoy my series. Comments are welcomed!!

1963

“The Snowy Day” by Jack Ezra Keats

This book is about a little boy named Peter and all of the adventures he has on a snowy winter day. At the end of the day he takes some snow and puts it in his pockets, but is later disappointed when his pockets are empty. Keats uses a wonderful technique of blending colors that adds a little animation to the pictures.

Honor Books

  • “The Sun is a Golden Earring” illustrated by Bernarda Bryson; text: Natalia M. Belting
  • “Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present” illustrated by Maurice Sendak; textL Charlotte Zoloto

1964

“Where the Wild Things Are” by Maurice Sendak

Max liked to make mischief and made it so much one day that his mother sent him to his room without supper. That night, he headed for the land where the wild things are and became the king of wild things. After a while, he sent the wild things to their room without supper. Soon, he smelled some good food and he decided to leave the wild things for home. Maurice Sendak’s memorable wild things will become forever etched in your child’s mind as funny and interesting creatures.

Honor Books

  • “Swimmy” by Leo Lionni
  • “All in the Morning Early” illustrated by Evaline Ness; text: Sorche Nic Leodhas (pseudonym for Leclaire Alger)
  • “Mother Goose and Nursery Rhymes” illustrated by Phillip Reed

1965

“May I Bring a Friend?” illustrated by Beni Montresor; text: Beatrice Schenk de Regniers

For six days, the King and Queen invite the main character in this story to their house. Each day, the child asks to bring a friend, and each day the King and Queen agree. The child brings different animals to the house each time. On the seventh day, the child’s friends invite the King and Queen to the zoo for tea.

Honor Books

  • “Rain Makes Applesauce” illustrated by Marvin Bileck; text: Julian Scheer
  • “The Wave” illustrated by Blair Lent; text: Margaret Hodges
  • “A Pocketful of Cricket” illustrated by Evaline Ness; text: Rebecca Caudill

1966

“Always Room for One More” illustrated by Nonny Hogrogian; text: Sorche Nic Leodhas (pseudonym for Leclair Alger)

Lachie MacLachlan and his wife are a hospitable couple who invite into their home everyone who comes to call. They fill the house with people until it collapses! But all of the people they had brought into their home help them rebuild their little house so that there is always room for one more. There is a glossary in the back of the Scottish terms that are used, as well as the music for the song. I found the pictures to be quite cute with many being made from plain lines. Blends of magenta and olive green are used to give the pictures some color.

Honor Books

  • “Hide and Seek Fog” illustrated by Roger Duvoisin; text: Alvin Tresselt
  • “Just Me” by Marie Hall Ets
  • “Tom Tit Tot” retold and illustrated by Evaline Ness

1967

“Sam, Bangs & Moonshine” by Evaline Ness

This is the story of a fisherman’s daughter named Samantha. Sam tells lies — moonshine, her father calls them. She often talks to her cat Bangs and her friend Thomas, who believed Sam’s stories. Sam send Thomas on wild goose chases, searching for her baby kangaroo which does not exist. When Sam sends Thomas and Bangs on another adventure and it begins to storm, Sam becomes quite worried. What happens to Thomas and Bangs during the storm? Will Sam ever learn to stop lying?

Honor Book

  • “One Wide River to Cross” illlustrated by Ed Emberley; text: adapted by Barbara Emberley

See also:

The Caldecott Medal and the Man for Whom It Was Named

Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1938-1942

Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1943-1947

Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1948-1952

Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1953-1957

Winners of the Caldecott Medal: 1958-1962

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