Focusing on the Positive

Fitness

Changing a lifestyle can feel like an overwhelming task.  You know you should exercise and that there needs to be serious changes with eating habits.  But where do you even get started?

The all-or-nothing approach is a fairly common one.  But it’s also more likely to result in defeat.

I used to have that mindset, that if I didn’t make drastic changes at one time, there was no point in trying.  It was all-or-nothing when it came to exercise and eating.

So as soon as I messed up (which could be as simple as missing one day of exercise), the rest of the week was shot…at least in my view.  Or if I couldn’t overcome the temptation to eat chocolate, I gorged the rest of the day.

Plain and simple, there is no chance of success this way.  So the all-or-nothing approach has to be completely disbanded.

One of the things I began to do a while back was enjoy the small successes.  Little steps do add up.

I might have made an unhealthy selection for one of my meals.  But instead of focusing on that, I would think about the dessert I passed on.

If I missed a day of exercise, I would focus on the day I was able to take a one mile walk.  It’s all about perspective and turning the negative into something positive.  Actually, it’s more about emphasizing the positive, rather than the negative.

For every habit you change—as small as it may seem at the time—progress is being made.  It doesn’t have to be these huge changes that occur at one time.

And if this is difficult for you to do, to think more about the positive steps, then I have a suggestion.  Begin to write them down.

Keep a list of every right choice you make, of every success you experience.  Then go back when you are feeling defeated and read your list.  This will be a great motivator.

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About Stephanie Romero

Stephanie Romero is a professional blogger for Families and full-time web content writer. She is the author and instructor of an online course, "Recovery from Abuse," which is currently being used in a prison as part of a character-based program. She has been married to her husband Dan for 21 years and is the mother of two teenage children who live at home and one who is serving in the Air Force.

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